crowns

Explaining Dental Crowns

dental-crowns-problemsThere are times where the best answer for a patient is not found in dental implants but in dental crowns.  Dental crowns are a response for many patients that have either cosmetic needs or health concerns.  Let’s discuss what a dental crown is, its function and some of the reasons a patient might choose to have a crown placed.

What is a dental crown? A dental crown is a dental restoration that covers the tooth. The covering is cemented to the tooth and will fully cover everything that is at and above the gum line.  A filling will restore a portion of the tooth and a crown will cover the entire tooth.

What are dental crowns made of? Dental crowns can be made from either porcelain, zirconium, lithium disilicate or a metal alloy such as palidium or gold.

Why do people have crowns put on? Crowns are often used cosmetically, to restore a tooth to the original form or to improve the look of the teeth in overall appearance. They can also be used for health reasons. For those that have weak teeth they can be placed in order to strengthen the teeth.

The Fitzgerald Dental Center is equipped to place crowns. Please contact the office if you wish to schedule an appointment.

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Dental Veneers: The Placement and Strength of Veneers and Crowns

dentalveneersWhen shopping for a new automobile, there are many factors that one will take into consideration. The functionality, quality and caliber of vehicles vary from brand to brand and from model to model.  In the same way when looking at the type of dental veneers to have placed on your teeth there are various types of materials that will offer variances in strength, look and longevity.  The strength of the dental veneers and the crown is dependent on both the material and the bonding of the veneer as the strength of bonded crowns and veneers change once they are bonded on.

The process by which veneers are made and placed on the tooth differs depending on the material that one uses to create the dental veneers or the crown.  Below are examples of the different kinds of materials that are used for dental veneers and the levels of strength that each of them offers.

An Introduction to Layering

All feldspathic materials are layered, meaning that the lab technician physically layers the porcelain on the veneer or crown.

Placed on the Natural Teeth

  • Pressed porcelain veneers can be made of 100% pressed porcelain, which is the strongest option.
  • Feldspathic materials can be placed on the front surface of the natural teeth to make them look like natural teeth.

Placed Over Crowns

  • Porcelain layered on metal crowns are strong, but they are generally layered with feldspathic porcelain, which means they can break.
  • Zirconium layered with feldspathic like materials.
  • Pressed porcelain crowns with no feldspathic materials on them at all.

Strength of Veneers and Crowns

  • Feldspathic veneers – around 80 mPA – Some studies have it as high as 150 mPA.
  • Pressed veneers – Non-layered 240 mPA – Layering does not affect the core strength, but you can still chip the areas that are layered. These layered areas are 150 mPa.
  • Porcelain to metal crowns – 500-700 mPA – Layering does not affect the core strength, but you can still chip the areas that are layered. These layered areas are 150 mPa.
  • Zirconium to porcelain crowns – 1000 mPA – Layering does not affect the core strength, but you can still chip the areas that are layered. These layered areas are 150 mPa.
  • Full pressed EMAX – 400 mPA – Layering is not used.

Bonding

The exact same type and method of adhesive dentistry is used when bonding either the feldspathic or pressed porcelain veneers onto the teeth.